Clicky

I have Windows 2008 Small Business Server (license/DVD). I installed the OS and went through the prompts to setup the domain, etc...

I need some assistance configuring microsoft exchange from scratch.  I cannot find any resources on Google. I have never setup Exchange from scratch so it's a bit overwhelming at this point.

I'm basically looking to setup EXchange in-house, with the ability to set it up remotely on Outlook, and have OWA enabled for users.

My environment is: Windows 2008 R2 Standard domain controller and 10 workstations running XP pro connected to the DC.  I was thinking about setting up another box with smb2008/exchange 2007.

any ideas/resources/dvd's out there?

asked 12/12/2011 10:03

fstinc's gravatar image

fstinc ♦♦


8 Answers:
SBS 2008 sets up Exchange for you automatically. No manual configuration on the server is required. For mail to be delivered, your router/firewall and DNS need to be configured properly, but there is nothing SBS specific, or even Exchange specific, about this. Exchange uses SMTP as does every other public internet email server, and the DNS requirements are similarly OS agnostic. If you are unfamiliar with SBS, I strongly recommend picking up a book to help ease your administration duties. Microsoft Press and SAMS both have good books that are SBS-specific and cover everything you'll need to manage the server on a day-to-day basis. Partnering with an SBSC for more advanced and non-daily maintenance would also be advisable.

-Cliff
link

answered

cgaliher's gravatar image

cgaliher

*Note in an SBS environment you can only have one GC (Global Catalog) and one domain controller. SBS can also not doing Federation Trusts, so even if you had your SBS and Server 2008r2 on different networks, you would not be able to "link" them. Finally, the best possible solution in your case if you have a good working DC already, SBS may not be the best system, unless you would do a swing migration to SBS 2008/2011 and transfer FSMO etc. to the SBS. Likewise, you could also purchase another server and 'throw' exchange on that, and have that act as an exchange server.

Definitely some things to think about.

-Jared
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 18:31:07

jaredr80's gravatar image

jaredr80

SBS *CAN* have multiple GCs and multiple domain controllers.

The restrictions on SBS are that it must hold all FSMO roles (and a GC is not a FSMO role), cannot support federated trusts, and because of how child domains work in a multi-domain forest, that "no trusts" rule means that SBS must be at the root of the forest and does not support child domains. That's it. GCs are good. Other domain controllers are good. Common, in fact, with SBS installs that have branch offices. And same-domain installs and migration paths exist and are fully supported.

-Cliff
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 18:38:02

cgaliher's gravatar image

cgaliher

My apologies, I must have interpreted the information incorrectly.
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 18:42:41

jaredr80's gravatar image

jaredr80

so the best solution is to throw exchange on a new box using windows 2008 R2 standard? NO SBS.
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 18:43:44

fstinc's gravatar image

fstinc

What is "best" will be very dependent on your expectations, level of expertise, available hardware and software, and environment. Exchange on a domain controller is a maintenance headache that, with SBS, the SBS team deals with for you. If you were to roll servers out on standard products, I'd *never* do that. So that turns your environment into a two-server minimum. Similarly, SBS is easier to administer in most cases. But SBS has user/device limits and certain topology limits that make it less than appropriate for some environments. Cost of licenses and CALs is yet another factor. In short, you have to do an organizational analysis and pick the product(s) that are best fitted to your needs. None of us can answer that for you.

My previous answer was strictly to the question you had asked. You had SBS license and media and had installed the OS from that media. In *that* scenario, Exchange is pre-configured for you which, as I said above, is one of the benefits of SBS. Easier administration. In such a case, you need little to no configuration, but an SBS book would be a good reference if you aren't familiar with administering a Windows box and Exchange. It was not an endorsement that such a setup is the best thing for you. Nor is this reply an endorsement for standalone products. You must do that analysis yourself, as only you are in the appropriate position to do so.

-Cliff
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 19:16:49

cgaliher's gravatar image

cgaliher

Understood. I 'm just confused on whether I CAN or CAN'T setup SBS 2008 to run exchange if I already have a Windows 2008 R2 Domain Controller.
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 19:26:05

fstinc's gravatar image

fstinc

Yes, you can. You will need to install the server in migration mode (technet has SBS 2003 to SBS 2008 and SBS 2008 to SBS 2008 documents) and then skip the steps that do not pertain to your environment. So if, for example, your existing environment does not have Exchange, then you'd skip the steps about migrating existing mailboxes to the new Exchange server and skip the steps to migrate the public folders. Similarly, if you do not currently use SharePoint, you can skip those steps.

Alternatively, you can purchase a kit from sbsmigration.com. Their kits have custom tailored documentation for various scenarios and, in your case, may be easier to follow as you won't have to decide which steps to ignore and which don't, since their kit will include instructions for moving from a 2008 R2 standard environment to SBS 2008 (while optionally keeping the 2008 R2 server in production), and the kits also come with support.

Your choice on which route to go, but I have done such deployments beore and it does work as expected. With that said, unless you have a compelling reason (and if you have a license and media, then price may be that compelling reason) I think you'll have a better experience with SBS 2011, as both of your domain controllers will be based on 2008 R2. SBS 2008 is based on 2008 (non-R2) and you will therefore actually be regressing in regards to your DC infrastructure.

-Cliff
link

answered 2011-12-12 at 19:29:45

cgaliher's gravatar image

cgaliher

Your answer
[hide preview]

Follow this question

By Email:

Once you sign in you will be able to subscribe for any updates here

By RSS:

Answers

Answers and Comments

Tags:

×43
×23

Asked: 12/12/2011 10:03

Seen: 293 times

Last updated: 12/12/2011 11:54