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We have a small MS access database and was looking for a low cost solution that would import the DB.  We have two MS 2008 STD servers and 8 client computers running XP Pro and Windows 7 Pro.  The client computers are the only way to access the DB so the limit of concurrent sessions to the DB would be under 10.

asked 12/10/2011 10:35

tjmustang's gravatar image

tjmustang ♦♦


6 Answers:
Please elaborate.  Do you have a functioning Access application already?  What is the source of the data you want to import and what is the target?
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answered

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dqmq

We have a functioning MS Access DB.

The existing Access DB would be the source.

"We have a small MS access database and was looking for a low cost solution that would import the DB.  We have two MS 2008 STD servers and 8 client computers running XP Pro and Windows 7 Pro.  The client computers are the only way to access the DB so the limit of concurrent sessions to the DB would be under 10."
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answered 2011-12-11 at 07:15:30

tjmustang's gravatar image

tjmustang

OK, I've got this much: You want a low cost solution to pull data from an exsiting Access DB.  Where do you want to put it?  I presume you want it on one or both windows servers, but what's the target environment: Access, Sql Server, Oracle, Excel, sharepoint...
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answered 2011-12-11 at 07:37:22

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dqmq

The new solution and DB could go on one server or in the cloud.  We just need each client PC to be able to access the DB.

Target Env is low cost.  Right now we could purchase Access 2010 for $100.00 per seat.  If any other solution is close to $800 or more we would simply stay with Access.
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answered 2011-12-11 at 08:01:10

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tjmustang

Access can certainly handle 10-20 users and is without a doubt a low-cost solution. This assumes your data requirements don't exceed Access limitations.   You said "small", so I assume you are OK on that count.

With Access, you should "split" your database, if you haven't already.  (There's a wizard to help).   That gives you a shared Access backend database that goes on one of the servers and a separate Access front end that contains reports, queries, and forms.   The front end can be shared, as well, but it is generally considered better to distribute a separate copy to each user workstation.

All this should be a relatively economical and painless retrofit of your existing application.  As for cost, you really only need to purchase an Access 2010 license for your developers.  You can distribute a run-time version of the Access application to users for free.

One last thought.  If you outgrow Access DB, you can preserver your investement in programming the Access application, by upgrading the backend part to SQL Server.  At the entry-level, you can use SQL Server Express, which is free.  



   
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answered 2011-12-11 at 09:09:18

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dqmq

If you're budget is $800, then migrating to anything won't be cheap - you'll have a lot of training and database programming required to migrate in any instance I can imagine and that won't be cheap.  Personally, I don't trust access in a multi-user environment... I've had too many problems over the years with Access databases corrupting... and I've heard the argument that "if done right" they don't corrupt - then they're too finicky and I can't trust those who created the database because I've had "professionally" created Access databases corrupt too frequently.

That said, Access databases can live on anything... a Windows Server, an XP workstation, a 7 Workstation, a NAS... as long as it's local (to the network) storage.

The connection limits are:
XP Home - 5 users
XP Pro - 10 users
Win 7 - 20 users
Server - 4 Billion users (but you need CALs)
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answered 2011-12-11 at 09:49:10

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leew

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Asked: 12/10/2011 10:35

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Last updated: 12/15/2011 11:12