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I am looking to build a wireless network in my office.  I am looking to purchase 3 Access Points to cover my building.  I prefer Access Points over wireless routers so users can roam the building without having to reconnect to different networks.

The only hardware I have is a cable modem supplied by my ISP.

I am assuming I need to buy a wired router that my ISP will plug into and then each access point will plug into this router?  What provides DHCP? One of the Access Points or All of the Access Points?

asked 11/11/2011 03:31

ohmErnie's gravatar image

ohmErnie ♦♦


7 Answers:
OK you need one router with wireless access pint (that's the common wireless routers you find everywhere), not the second and the third can simply be access pints or other wireless routers. The reason I said they can be other wireless routers because you can disable DHCP on an wireless router and it becomes an access point. And the difference in price isn't that much. But again why buy something extra if you don't need, so it's better just to get a Access Point.

So to summerize: One wireless router and two Access Points is what you need.

Let me know if you need more info on how to configure them.
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answered

emilgas's gravatar image

emilgas

To clarify, besides disabling the DHCP server in the routers, it's also necessary to connect them to the network using one of their LAN ports (rather than the WAN/Internet port) in order to use them as access points.
Unless it's one of the few routers that allows disabling NAT, or a GPL-source router that's DD-WRT capable... in either of those cases you can use the WAN port but essentially bypass the router function.

> I prefer Access Points over wireless routers so users can roam the
> building without having to reconnect to different networks


They will still need to reconnect. Unless you use a RADIUS server with P-EAP and fast-reconnect enabled on the authentication server and the clients, there will still be a noticable amount of time (15 seconds, minimum) while they switch from 1 AP to another... and by default the clients will try to maintain the current connection, no matter how much stronger the signal of the nearest AP. That behavior can usually be tweaked in the driver if it's a broadcom card, or in the connection manager if atheros (but I don't recall Intel having anything for that in their PRO/set connection manager).
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answered 2011-11-11 at 11:44:08

Darr247's gravatar image

Darr247

I'm not sure of any router that has an option to disable specific services that would make the WAN port into a regular port. I think most consumer routers are designed that WAN port has the routing and NAT enabled. So the only thing you can do is Disable the DHCP and not use the WAN port at all.

Now unless you know of some sort of a Hacked firmware such as DD-WRT or something along those lines then that's a different story.

The second portion of your question with the connect and disconnect from one access point to another is true. With a simple setup like your is what you will have to deal with.
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answered 2011-11-12 at 22:58:00

emilgas's gravatar image

emilgas

I purchased a wireless router and 3 Access Points.
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answered 2011-11-13 at 11:31:18

ohmErnie's gravatar image

ohmErnie

Darr247... has the correct posted answer I was looking for.  How do I reallocate points?
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answered 2011-11-14 at 07:45:29

ohmErnie's gravatar image

ohmErnie

Sorry...emilgas has the correct posted answer I was looking for.  How do I reallocate points?

This is not my day...lol
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answered 2011-11-14 at 07:59:34

ohmErnie's gravatar image

ohmErnie

I'm not sure how to do it, if the forum admins cannot do it then don't sweat it.
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answered 2011-11-14 at 08:00:36

emilgas's gravatar image

emilgas

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Asked: 11/11/2011 03:31

Seen: 247 times

Last updated: 11/13/2011 11:45